Overall Score

6.8 in 2015 6.7
0 2.5 5 7.5 10

Key Finding

Increasing job vacancy rates and rising real wages in high-skilled industries are indicative of improving economic conditions and represent increased stresses in the labour market. Relief is provided by an improvement in Swedish regulatory environment.

BREAKDOWN OF SEVEN INDICATOR SCORES

Scores
0 2.5 5 7.5 10
Education
flexibility
8.4
Labour market
participation
4.0
Labour market
flexibility
4.9
Talent
mismatch
7.9
Overall wage
pressure
7.6
Wage pressure in
high-skill industries
9.7
Wage pressure in
high-skill occupations
4.8

COUNTRY OVERVIEW

View from the ground

Sweden’s overall score has increased by 0.1 compared to the previous year, although the labour market overall is getting stronger and the unemployment rate decreasing. An area where we see the highest stress levels is within high-skill industries. As stated last year we believe short-term solutions have to come from business initiatives as we see no political solution in the near future. An additional factor at play is the high amount of refugees Sweden has accepted, it remains to see how this will impact the labour market but for now the economy stays strong.

Johan Alsen, Managing Director, Hays Sweden

Johan Alsen, Managing Director, Hays Sweden

Country Profile

In Sweden, solid consumption and investment spending are forecast to support GDP growth in 2016.

The labour market is continuing to strengthen, with the unemployment rate falling. Looking ahead, strong domestic demand and output growth this year should help labour market conditions to improve further.

In addition, at the beginning of the year the government launched a fast-track initiative to help refugees enter the labour market; this should increase the integration of refugees on a work and cultural basis as language lessons are part of this.

Johan Alsen, Managing Director, Hays Sweden

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