New Zealand

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Overall Score

5.2 in 2015 5.1
0 2.5 5 7.5 10

Key Finding

Strong net inward migration has boosted the talent pool available in New Zealand. This has led to employment growth and helped keep wage pressures relatively subdued. The Index rose due to an increase in the differences in wages paid in high-skill occupations relative to low-skilled ones.

BREAKDOWN OF SEVEN INDICATOR SCORES

Scores
0 2.5 5 7.5 10
Education
flexibility
4.7
Labour market
participation
6.8
Labour market
flexibility
4.3
Talent
mismatch
4.8
Overall wage
pressure
2.7
Wage pressure in
high-skill industries
10.0
Wage pressure in
high-skill occupations
3.4

COUNTRY OVERVIEW

View from the ground

New Zealand may no longer be a ‘rock star’ economy but a construction industry building significant momentum, most notably in Auckland, and a growing services sector are creating new roles and keeping the job market buoyant. At the same time, they are absorbing the inflow of both migrants and Kiwi’s returning home from Australia, with demand exceeding even this increased candidate supply. Yet as these findings show, labour market participation is already on the high side while wage pressure in high-skill industries cannot get more acute. Clearly new and creative strategies are required to identify and successfully attract the right candidates, especially in high-skill industries.

Jason Walker, Managing Director, Hays New Zealand

Jason Walker, Managing Director, Hays New Zealand

Country Profile

Last year, New Zealand was characterised by robust GDP growth.

Net exports were a key driver behind the solid outcome, with a surge in tourism more than offsetting subdued goods exports.

Meanwhile, all the key elements of final domestic demand grew at a reasonable pace.

Household spending is forecast to remain robust this year, supported by firm labour market conditions.

Jason Walker, Managing Director, Hays New Zealand

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