Comparison Tool

Comparison Tool

Report Download

Report Download

Compare Country Results

Compare Country Results
Countries
netherlands flag

The Netherlands

View local website

Overall score

Score by Indicator

5.7
in 2016 5.7
0 2.5 5 7.5 10

Key drivers

Talent mismatch

Last year the number of unfilled job vacancies rose for the third year in a row and the trend continued for the first quarter of 2017.

Overall wage pressure

While the Netherlands’ labour market has remained stable overall, wage growth is expected to ease in 2017.

Wage pressure in high-skill occupations

Faster wage growth in high-skill occupations led to wider occupational wage dispersion than in the past. This puts pressure on businesses seeking highly-skilled staff.

COMPARISON TOOL

Select a country to compare with The Netherlands:

COUNTRY OVERVIEW

View from the ground

Robert van Veggel, Managing Director, Hays Netherlands

At first glance the Overall Index score remains the same compared to last year; overall wage pressure is low and companies are able to recruit candidates for regular positions. At the same time the market has become tighter for highly-skilled positions; both the wage pressure and talent mismatch indicators show this with increases year-on-year. Employers are continuing to struggle to find candidates, while the number of vacancies have risen. In other words the market polarises: some niche markets are struggling for talent while others are having no issues recruiting for positions and therefore don’t feel the same pressure. The new DBA Act for self-employed workers has created more uncertainty and will need amendments to it as soon as the new Government is appointed.

Robert van Veggel, Managing Director, Hays Netherlands

Country Profile

Labour market conditions in the Netherlands have not changed significantly since last year. At 5.7, the country’s Hays Global Index score suggests some mild labour market pressures relative to the past.

One example of labour market pressure is that job vacancies in the Netherlands grew in 2016, which indicates that employers are having some trouble finding the talented workers they need.

A fundamental structural challenge that employers in the Netherlands will likely encounter in the long run is that the UN expects the working age population to shrink by half a percent between 2015 and 2020, and 1.8 per cent between 2020 and 2025. That means employers are increasingly dealing with a diminishing pool of talent.

Key skills in demand

  • Account managers
  • Software engineers
  • Project leaders
  • Sales mangers
  • Online developers

News and Press Materials

Robert van Veggel, Managing Director, Hays Netherlands