Comparison Tool

Comparison Tool

Report Download

Report Download

Compare Country Results

Compare Country Results
Countries

Overall score

Score by Indicator

4.3
in 2016 4.4
0 2.5 5 7.5 10

Key drivers

Labour market participation

Italy’s labour market participation is forecast to decline slightly this year. This is unlikely to put significant pressure on growing firms, as high unemployment means there is less pressure.

Overall wage pressure

Wage pressure on Italian businesses has eased. Real wages are expected to fall this year, with modest inflation eroding small nominal increases.

Wage pressure in high-skill industries

Relatively large falls in average wages in high-skill sectors such as professional and scientific activities reduced the wage gap between high- and lower-skill industries.

COMPARISON TOOL

Select a country to compare with Italy:

COUNTRY OVERVIEW

View from the ground

Carlos Soave, Managing Director, Hays Italy

Unemployment has become a key long-term structural problem in Italy, with the figure now standing at 11.5 per cent, and the picture is even more sever when looking at long-term youth unemployment, at 39 per cent. In the short term, this could be an advantage to businesses looking to expand as they have a large pool of skilled workers to choose from. However, the situation could affect the businesses’ growth ambitions in the future, as unemployment will reduce the number of experienced workers in the years to come. This year, the pressure on Italian businesses will ease as real wages are expected to fall and labour market participation is forecast to decline slightly. Moreover, the wage gap between high- and lower-skilled industries will decrease due to the relatively large falls in average wages in high-skill sectors.

Carlos Soave, Managing Director, Hays Italy

Country Profile

Unemployment has become a key long-term structural problem in Italy. Businesses looking to expand in the short term may benefit, but it will pose challenges in the future.

Nearly one in eight people who want a job in Italy cannot find one and more than half of the unemployed have been so for a year or longer. Italy’s youth unemployment rate is even more severe, at nearly 39 per cent.

Businesses looking for talent workers today therefore have a large pool of people to choose from. However, this could be a problem in the future, because unemployment will reduce the pipeline of experienced workers to tap into in the years to come.

 

Key skills in demand

  • Export managers
  • CFO/ finance managers
  • Operation managers/plant managers
  • Customer service managers
  • Purchasing managers

News and Press Materials

Carlos Soave, Managing Director, Hays Italy