Overall Score

6.3 in 2015 5.7
0 2.5 5 7.5 10

Key Finding

Behind the increase in Ireland’s overall Index score was a pickup in overall wage pressures and a fall in labour market participation. On a more positive note, skills mismatch appeared to ease with a reduction in both structural and long-term unemployment.

BREAKDOWN OF SEVEN INDICATOR SCORES

Scores
0 2.5 5 7.5 10
Education
flexibility
3.1
Labour market
participation
7.8
Labour market
flexibility
3.0
Talent
mismatch
10.0
Overall wage
pressure
6.3
Wage pressure in
high-skill industries
5.8
Wage pressure in
high-skill occupations
8.3

COUNTRY OVERVIEW

View from the ground

Overall, the Irish jobs market is buoyant and conditions are continuing to improve. Businesses are generally confident about the outlook for the year ahead and are continuing to invest in growing their teams. However, the talent mismatch remains a significant issue and skills shortages are still prevalent across IT, construction and life sciences. Tech companies in particular are finding it difficult to source the skills they need and in construction, there is a shortage of surveyors, engineers and architects. There are schemes in place to encourage Irish professionals who have been working overseas to return and enjoy this period of growth.

Richard Eardley, Managing Director, Hays Ireland

Richard Eardley, Managing Director, Hays Ireland

United Kingdom

The Irish economy continues to possess important economic advantages, including a very low corporate tax rate and a flexible labour market.

The Irish unemployment rate is steadily edging downwards and is now well below its crisis peak.

While wage pressure is starting to emerge, modest wage growth in Ireland during the crisis years means that relative unit labour costs have fallen considerably.

This will help to support exports and goods that compete with imports.

Richard Eardley, Managing Director, Hays Ireland

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