Overall Score

3.4 in 2015 3.7
0 2.5 5 7.5 10

Key Finding

Belgium keeps attracting skilled foreign workers, with obvious gains to the alleviating the country’s skills gaps. Decreases in the overall and industrial wage pressures provide a further downward push to the overall score.

BREAKDOWN OF SEVEN INDICATOR SCORES

Scores
0 2.5 5 7.5 10
Education
flexibility
6.0
Labour market
participation
5.8
Labour market
flexibility
3.6
Talent
mismatch
1.6
Overall wage
pressure
2.6
Wage pressure in
high-skill industries
0.0
Wage pressure in
high-skill occupations
4.3

COUNTRY OVERVIEW

View from the ground

In 2015, the Belgian economy grew by 1.4 per cent and performed better than previously expected. The outlook for 2016 shows a similar growth pace but that should pick up again in 2017 to reach 1.5 per cent, the critical threshold for significant job creation. Thanks to structural reforms initiated by the Belgian Federal Government, such as lower taxes on labour, the overall job market will continue to improve. It is expected that around 140,000 extra jobs will be created up to 2018. However, skills shortages in high-skill areas such as engineering, IT, pharma and digital will continue to put pressure on the Belgian job market. On the other hand, important developments for the country are readiness for investments in R&D, rise of flexible jobs and digital and data profiles.

Robby Vanuxem, Managing Director, Hays Belgium

Robby Vanuxem, Managing Director, Hays Belgium

Country Profile

The new administration has taken significant steps to boost job creation and cope with the cost of an ageing population – particularly through wage moderation, pension reform and a tax shift.

Businesses are taking advantage of the latter reform that reduces labour costs, helping the unemployment rate to drop, by also boosting private consumption.

Robby Vanuxem, Managing Director, Hays Belgium

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